Tip! Daddy's got a squeeze bag; targets never sleep at night.

Racer88

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This isn't about building precision rifles. But it's about shooting them....

Pardon the rather strained attempt at a humorous musical reference in the title. 🤪

My buddy who dragged me into this precision shooting rabbit hole once said to me, "With precision shooting, a lot of little things add up to a big thing." (Not claiming he originated the aphorism... he probably heard it from someone else. But, I heard it from him. :) )

Lovin'... touchin'.... squueeezin'...
(another musical reference)

Anyway, this post is about an unexpected "discovery" about the rear squeeze bag (that goes under the butt of the rifle). The front, in my case, is supported by a bipod. Some folks use a big bag as a front support. The purpose of the rear bag is to fine-tune the sight picture (primarily vertical / up and down). My then-15-year-old daughter demonstrates use of the rear squeeze bag...

1707787673701.png


Maybe what follows here is basic knowledge, and I missed it or forgot it as I've been going through this learning curve.

So, for whatever reason, I've always "squeezed UP" until my cross-hair comes down on the target and held it there. On rare occasion, I've even gotten a hand cramp from holding it there too long before I break the shot.

Then one day at the rifle range, I had a little epiphany. Instead of squeezing UP until the cross-hair I started by squeezing the bag BEFORE I establish my cheek-weld. Since there is no downward pressure (from my cheek-weld or the weight of my "big head"), the squeeze takes very little effort. I'm just squeezing against the weight of the rifle, which isn't much.

Then when I settle on the rifle with my cheek-weld firmly established, the cross-hair is well BELOW the target. I'm still holding the initial squeeze.

Think of it as "pre-squeezing" the bag.

Now, I RELAX my squeeze and let the cross-hair rise up until it's on target. Then I just HOLD my "squeeze" at that point.

So, instead of squeezing the bag UP (pushing the cross-hair DOWN) by INCREASING the tension in my hand... I let my hand RELAX until the sight picture is where it needs to be (cross-hair comes UP on the target).

Group-with-without-flyer.jpg


Did that make sense? Are you guys thinking, "Well, DUH, Racer... Everyone knows THAT?" LOL!

Or did I stumble into something that could help some folks who are also spiraling down this precision rifle rabbit hole? :D I've read a ton, taken some live courses, and watched a ton of instructional videos, and I don't recall seeing or hearing anything about this, specifically. I found it to be easier.
 
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I shoot very little rifle, so I can't comment at all on the post. Just wanted to give a thumbs up and LMFAO at the title line!
 
This isn't about building precision rifles. But it's about shooting them....

Pardon the rather strained attempt at a humorous musical reference in the title. 🤪

My buddy who dragged me into this precision shooting rabbit hole once said to me, "With precision shooting, a lot of little things add up to a big thing." (Not claiming he originated the aphorism... he probably heard it from someone else. But, I heard it from him. :) )

Lovin'... touchin'.... squueeezin'...
(another musical reference)

Anyway, this post is about an unexpected "discovery" about the rear squeeze bag (that goes under the butt of the rifle). The front, in my case, is supported by a bipod. Some folks use a big bag as a front support. The purpose of the rear bag is to fine-tune the sight picture (primarily vertical / up and down). My then-15-year-old daughter demonstrates use of the rear squeeze bag...

View attachment 17724

Maybe what follows here is basic knowledge, and I missed it or forgot it as I've been going through this learning curve.

So, for whatever reason, I've always "squeezed UP" until my cross-hair comes down on the target and held it there. On rare occasion, I've even gotten a hand cramp from holding it there too long before I break the shot.

Then one day at the rifle range, I had a little epiphany. Instead of squeezing UP until the cross-hair I started by squeezing the bag BEFORE I establish my cheek-weld. Since there is no downward pressure (from my cheek-weld or the weight of my "big head"), the squeeze takes very little effort. I'm just squeezing against the weight of the rifle, which isn't much.

Then when I settle on the rifle with my cheek-weld firmly established, the cross-hair is well BELOW the target. I'm still holding the initial squeeze.

Think of it as "pre-squeezing" the bag.

Now, I RELAX my squeeze and let the cross-hair rise up until it's on target. Then I just HOLD my "squeeze" at that point.

So, instead of squeezing the bag UP (pushing the cross-hair DOWN) by INCREASING the tension in my hand... I let my hand RELAX until the sight picture is where it needs to be (cross-hair comes UP on the target).

View attachment 17725

Did that make sense? Are you guys thinking, "Well, DUH, Racer... Everyone knows THAT?" LOL!

Or did I stumble into something that could help some folks who are also spiraling down this precision rifle rabbit hole? ::D I've read a ton and watched a ton of instructional videos, and I don't recall seeing anything about this, specifically. I found it to be easier.

If you haven't... Try it and let me know what you think. Maybe I should make a video?
Makes perfect sense to me! (y)(y)
 
Picked up a set of Caldwell shooting bags a while back and absolutely love them. The rear bag "ears" allow fine tuning which is especially important when doing load development.
 
One thing I learned at a USMC rifle clinic was that if your position works for you and produces results, then it isn't "wrong" to do it that way no matter what the local "experts" say. My standing position with the M14 was not producing good scores and the Marine coach had me try several different things. What wound up working the best was something I was initially taught NOT to do by the local guy. Standing scores jump up 10 points, and that year at Perry I legged out.
Nice to have little epiphanies like that every now and then, isn't it? ;)
 
I picked these up from TEMU for about $6. Filled them with 1-2lbs of corn cob vibe tumbler media (I had a 5lb box). They work good for the money. :)

beany4.jpg
 
I have been using the “pre-squeeze” and slowly release method on my last couple of outings. I prefer it as it has less hand fatigue.
 
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