Everytown Describes Lever-Actions as 'Deadly Innovation'

Curious for those of you in the know about lever actions..

If you were to want to buy a .357 lever action now, what model would you purchase and why?
First, ask yourself a few questions.

What are you going to use the rifle for?
Casual target shooting?
Hunting?
Do I want to mount a scope or red dot on it?
Do I want to mount a suppressor on it?
Am I going to reload for it, or factory ammo only?
What is my budget?
The answers to these questions will help narrow your focus from all the brands, to one or two.

So, here are the pros and cons of each brand as I see it.

Genuine Winchester Model 92 made in the USA.
Pros:

The classic Old West lever gun. If you have a thing for John Wayne, this is the original.
Excellent quality in the pre-64 made guns. Quality dipped after 1964 in the US made guns. The later Japanese production was also high quality, but a lot of peeps think this is sacrilege.

Cons:
Only the later production models are drilled and tapped for scope mounts. There was a side mount bracket for the older ones, but it is a bit clunky.
The Winchester design is more complex internally than the Marlin. Depending on your Mad Skilz, you may want to leave disassembly to a gunsmith.
Winchester guns and clones cannot accept heavy for the caliber (over 180gr) bullets. It's a length thing.
Everything Winchester is expensive these days. Pre-64 guns are going to command collector prices.

Italian and Brazilian Winchester Model 92 clones.
The Italian guns are higher quality, but more expensive, but still a lot less than a real Winchester. The Brazilian guns exhibit more machining marks and the action may need some slicking up to cycle as smooth as a real Winchester, but they are more affordable, especially if it is going to get bumped and scratched in the deer woods. Being these are current production, they are drilled and tapped for a scope.

Marlin model 1894C
Pros:

Simpler design makes detail stripping much easier. Bolt is easy to remove for cleaning from the breech.
All Marlin 1894C's are drilled and tapped. Stainless models were available.

Cons:

Ruger owns Marlin now and has been introducing models gradually after a thorough engineering review. The 1894 in 44 Mag was recently released, but the 1894C in 357 is not currently available, but is promised.
I would avoid any of the Remington made Marlins. Remington had lots of quality issues. Simply put, if you want a Marlin 1894C, get an old one made by Marlin in New Haven or wait for the Ruger. The Ruger Marlins I have looked at exhibited excellent quality.

Henry
I have no first hand experience with a Henry, but their reputation is good and their Customer Service is crowed about by peeps that have needed it. The few that I know that own a Henry rifle are very happy with it.
Henry lists several 357 models with brass and steel receivers with a variety of finishes. There is also a threaded model.
Current production Henrys have a side gate like the Winchester and Marlin for loading in addition to the mag tube loading method. Older models loaded through a port in the mag tube like a 22LR.

Further reading

This is of interest mostly if you want to hunt with a 357 Marlin lever gun and reload for it.


 
Curious for those of you in the know about lever actions..

If you were to want to buy a .357 lever action now, what model would you purchase and why?
Marlin 336 or Model 1895 in 45-70. Arguably the best mass produced lever action made. Especially since Ruger acquired Marlin.

Why? A design proven for over a century, the ideal backwoods gun that good for everything. Hunting, defense, sport shooting.

You cant go wrong with Henry either, but get the side gate model since you are a newb.

If you are going to plink, get a 22. If you want a serious home defense or hunting rifle, The 45-70 will never disappoint and no game is too big for it. Some lever purists like the 30-30. In the pistol calibers, I'm partial to the 44 vs. 357 for a lever action because my primary goal for those rifles was shooting large animals.

Read this: .357 Magnum vs .44 Magnum Lever Actions - Lucky Gunner Lounge
 
If I was getting another .357 lever gun it would be a
stainless Rossi .92 with a 16" barrel like the one in the
safe.

The one I have feeds everything up to and including
.38 special 148 grain wad cutters. With the shorty's
you have to slap the lever back and forth like it owes
you money but it works.

With my cast bullets and 8 cent primers I can still
shoot for about $5.50 a box of ammunition.

(in reality it takes 9 hours to cast, powder coat and
size a thousand rounds so if I was making minimum
wage the price per box would go to around $10.00 a
box +/-.) But I do it for fun.
 
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A good lever action or two is an itch that I want to scratch. Both in 45-70 and a .44 Magnum.

I already have bolt and semi-auto .22LR rifles, though I would like to have the Henry in .22. I haven’t personally encountered the new Marlins produced by Ruger, but have heard nothing but great things about them. So glad the Marlin brand is “back” under better ownership.
 
A good lever action or two is an itch that I want to scratch. Both in 45-70 and a .44 Magnum.

I already have bolt and semi-auto .22LR rifles, though I would like to have the Henry in .22. I haven’t personally encountered the new Marlins produced by Ruger, but have heard nothing but great things about them. So glad the Marlin brand is “back” under better ownership.
A friend bought one of the new Ruger made marlin 45-70's.
The quality is better than the New Haven made Marlins. Ruger took the time to do their due diligence, unlike Remington.
Buy a Ruger made Marlin with confidence.
 
A friend bought one of the new Ruger made marlin 45-70's.
The quality is better than the New Haven made Marlins. Ruger took the time to do their due diligence, unlike Remington.
Buy a Ruger made Marlin with confidence.
BTW, that's an excellent info link on the .357 load you provided. I could jump on that bandwagon easily. Food for thought. maybe a 45-70, a .357 and then add the .44mag later as it's already stepping into big bore territory that the 45-70 will own. lol...not a bad one among those 3 actually. Just different for different purposes.

Epiphany: WHY NOT HAVE ALL 3?

So glad you suggested that, you sly chap.... :LOL:
 
BTW, that's an excellent info link on the .357 load you provided. I could jump on that bandwagon easily. Food for thought. maybe a 45-70, a .357 and then add the .44mag later as it's already stepping into big bore territory that the 45-70 will own. lol...not a bad one among those 3 actually. Just different for different purposes.

Epiphany: WHY NOT HAVE ALL 3?

So glad you suggested that, you sly chap.... :LOL:
Sharing the knowledge is what this place is all about.

BTW, the LBT bullet mentioned in that article is also available from Accurate. That is where mine came from. When I ordered the mold, it came like a week and a half later. Being custom made to order, I thought that was exceptional. I slugged the Marlins bore and ordered the molds dimensions as per the instructions on the website. The mold dropped bullets at exactly the desired diameter for the Micro groove bore. (There is also a thread on Micro Groove barrels I posted if you buy an older Marlin that has that style of rifling. Ruger made Marlins are using conventional 6 groove barrels.)

And since I have discovered powder coating, I no longer lube bullets the traditional way. I originally started using it to keep the lead out of the suppressors, which it does beautifully. Plus, the powder can be had in any color if you want to color code supersonic from subsonic, or just to make pink bullets for the wife.

Accurate 36-185F

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These are 9mm, I don't have a photo of the 357 bullet after coating handy.

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50 yds., iron sights, old man eyes.
357 brass, Accurate 36-185F bullet, Bullseye powder.
Subsonic load fired with suppressor.

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I have several Accurate molds. They are exceptional. The CNC mills they
are built on can really crank them out. I have one mold that I ordered on
a Monday and got it on Saturday. They are set up for Lee mold handles.

I really like that company.
 
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