WOTD (watch of the day) Thread. Post yours!

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This is my first watch. It was assembled by my grandfather at the old Hamilton factory in Lancaster, PA and given to me on Christmas Eve, 1971, age 6. I'm currently in need of a grandson to pass it too. I grew up a mile from the factory and Dad and Pop both worked there, Dad in MIL products designing ordnance fuses and Pop did watch and ship cronometer building. I'll have to get around to posting other old Hamilton's I have.
 

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This is my first watch. It was assembled by my grandfather at the old Hamilton factory in Lancaster, PA and given to me on Christmas Eve, 1971, age 6. I'm currently in need of a grandson to pass it too. I grew up a mile from the factory and Dad and Pop both worked there, Dad in MIL products designing ordnance fuses and Pop did watch and ship cronometer building. I'll have to get around to posting other old Hamilton's I have.

That is REALLY cool! Looking forward to seeing what else you've got!
 
This is my first watch. It was assembled by my grandfather at the old Hamilton factory in Lancaster, PA and given to me on Christmas Eve, 1971, age 6. I'm currently in need of a grandson to pass it too. I grew up a mile from the factory and Dad and Pop both worked there, Dad in MIL products designing ordnance fuses and Pop did watch and ship cronometer building. I'll have to get around to posting other old Hamilton's I have.
What an awesome family keepsake. My father had a cousin he was close to who worked at Elgin until the early 60s'. I remember him from family gatherings when I was really young but don't know what he did there. He was a tool and die maker by trade.
 
A little morning maintenance on my other "watch". I didn't build this one, but I've been keeping it in running order for about thirty years.

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This is a Sessions Regulator No.4, circa 1917. This was originally a store advertising clock, though it's original owners never altered it (there is a second, simpler, paper dial face on the reverse side of the ledger board the owner could paint as they wished.) It was a gift from my ex-in-laws... err did that make them "out-laws"... when they disbanded the Rostraver, PA Grange an sold off the grange meeting hall.

Maintenance is pretty simple. About every decade or so, the ledger board needs removed, dust off the movement, clean the teeth of the escapement, and paint a little oil on the bearings with a 000 sable brush. No chimes or any other features, just a simple 14 day movement that has been running for over 100 years. Just keeps ticking away.

Time for the morning coffee
 
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A little morning maintenance on my other "watch". I didn't build this one, but I've been keeping it in running order for about thirty years.

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This is a Sessions Regulator No.4, circa 1917. This was originally a store advertising clock, though it's original owners never altered it (there is a second, simpler, paper dial face on the reverse side of the ledger board the owner could paint as they wished.) It was a gift from my ex-in-laws... err did that make them "out-laws"... when they disbanded the Rostraver, PA Grange an sold off the grange meeting hall.

Maintenance is pretty simple. About every decade or so, the ledger board needs removed, dust off the movement, clean the teeth of the escapement, and paint a little oil on the bearings with a 000 sable brush. No chimes or any other features, just a simple 14 day movement that has been running for over 100 years. Just keeps ticking away.

Time for the morning coffee
That's quite cool! Thanks for posting.

You've now reminded me of the two family clocks here that don't work. They're not too old and are from the 70s-80s.
I know nothing about clocks, but I've thought about taking a gander at these with a few sledge hammers and Snap-on pry bars. ;)
I can fix a lot of things, but for some reason I do a cursory look at the mechanical side of these things by opening the back panel and don't tackle it. I should probably look for some tutorials or Youtube videos to give me a jump start.
 
That's quite cool! Thanks for posting.

You've now reminded me of the two family clocks here that don't work. They're not too old and are from the 70s-80s.
I know nothing about clocks, but I've thought about taking a gander at these with a few sledge hammers and Snap-on pry bars. ;)
I can fix a lot of things, but for some reason I do a cursory look at the mechanical side of these things by opening the back panel and don't tackle it. I should probably look for some tutorials or Youtube videos to give me a jump start.

Give it a go. They don't work now, so you don't have anything to loose. If they are mechanical clocks, there are really only two long-term manufacturers of movements, regardless of who's name is on the dial. Hermle and Kieninger. There were a few more in the 1970's, like Urgo, that has since gone out of business.

Worst case, you can always put a new movement into the clock case and call it a day ;)
 
This watch is one my grandfather did not make. I bought it on Etsy 5 years ago as a gift for my son when he made Eagle Scout. It's a model 992B "railroad" watch. This is a WW II specimen that is engraved as belonging to the Ordnance Department.
The drawings that it's posed on were were a set of assembly blue prints I found in an old work notebook from 1957 that was in with stuff from my dad. They happened to be for the 992B. If anyone wants a set of the drawings I made .pdf's of them and will gladly share. They are on 11x17 paper.
Edit...what am I doing wrong that the pics have that annoying banner on the botton?
 

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Edit...what am I doing wrong that the pics have that annoying banner on the botton?

I'm not seeing a "banner". :unsure: I would be interested is looking at a pdf of the watch. You can "attach" it just like you would a picture...
 
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