'24 Subaru Outback - New Owner Diary

Outbacks are equipped with soul-sucking CVT transmissions only. :rolleyes: My ADHD wouldn't allow me to drive such a monstrosity... :D
 
Congratulations Racer! It looks badass all in black. Have you driven it enough for a good opinion on the CVT?
 
Outbacks are equipped with soul-sucking CVT transmissions only. :rolleyes: My ADHD wouldn't allow me to drive such a monstrosity... :D
I’m going to have to triple check the model. That being said, Subaru now makes their own CVT. I too detested CVT transmissions. These however, may win me over. They don’t have the failure rate Subaru once was plagued with.
 
I don't (yet) have a strong opinion on CVTs. Other than it's a crime to put one in a WRX! Manuals ONLY in performance oriented cars!

To me... an automatic slush box is an automatic slush box, either way.

So far, so good with the Subaru Outback.
 
I don't (yet) have a strong opinion on CVTs. Other than it's a crime to put one in a WRX! Manuals ONLY in performance oriented cars!

To me... an automatic slush box is an automatic slush box, either way.

So far, so good with the Subaru Outback.
Yep. And Dad does have the Outback. It seems like Subaru had not only produced their own CVT, but it’s a darn good one. I don’t mind an auto trans. Look what Porsche has in that department.
I would agree that a sports-car more or less demands one to row their own. It’s part of the visceral experience, also results in a lower GVW over an auto in the same car.

That said, when I rode in, and then drove for myself the McLaren 720s I didn't care that it was an auto….what an amazing experience that was. Hehe..
 
That said, when I rode in, and then drove for myself the McLaren 720s I didn't care that it was an auto….what an amazing experience that was. Hehe..
That's not an auto transmission. It's a dual clutch manual which can be used in "auto mode." Same with Porsche, Ferrari, Audi, BMW, etc. Those are not automatic transmissions, as in slush-boxes with torque converters. They are basically computer-operated sequential manual transmissions.

And sure... they're cool. I've driven many of them including Porsche 911, Lamborghini Gallardo, Ferrari F430, Audi S5, and McLaren 570S. (all belonged to friends or acquaintances)

I've driven them in "auto" and manual (paddle shifter) modes. Very very cool. But not the same satisfying experience as rowing a stick shift and heel-toe rev-matching downshifts on your own, old school style. (Realizing that most people don't know how to do that.)

I've also driven sequential manuals in race cars (Skip Barber Racing School) without synchro-mesh - aka "dog box transmission." So, you HAD to learn how to heel-toe / rev-match the downshifts. The up-shifts were done without using the clutch at all. FUN!
 
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Four days of driving my new Outback, and I am so impressed. Ergonomically, this car is very well thought out. The ride is smooth and quiet, but it feels solid.

It feels a fair bit bigger than what I'm used to driving. For the past 10 years, I've been driving a 2011 Camry. Before that, an '04 STI for eleven years! Before that, an '02 WRX. So, this is a big change in terms of style of car. It's a HUGE change in terms of technology!

I'm happy to be back in the Subaru world! I hope to be driving this for a long time. A really fantastic car.

But we've had a lot of rain, and this black car is DIRTY!
 
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IMG_7545.jpeg
 
That's not an auto transmission. It's a dual clutch manual which can be used in "auto mode." Same with Porsche, Ferrari, Audi, BMW, etc. Those are not automatic transmissions, as in slush-boxes with torque converters. They are basically computer-operated sequential manual transmissions.

And sure... they're cool. I've driven many of them including Porsche 911, Lamborghini Gallardo, Ferrari F430, Audi S5, and McLaren 570S. (all belonged to friends or acquaintances)

I've driven them in "auto" and manual (paddle shifter) modes. Very very cool. But not the same satisfying experience as rowing a stick shift and heel-toe rev-matching downshifts on your own, old school style. (Realizing that most people don't know how to do that.)

I've also driven sequential manuals in race cars (Skip Barber Racing School) without synchro-mesh - aka "dog box transmission." So, you HAD to learn how to heel-toe / rev-match the downshifts. The up-shifts were done without using the clutch at all. FUN!
Technicality noted. Still not a manual stick shift in the truest sense of the word, was my point- paddle shifters and no clutch pedal. Not the same. So much of the old school coordination, timing and feel is void from those..pretty much push-button shifting on a lever.

I learned on an old 3 on the tree….’63 Nova Wagon, ‘59 GMC step side….and I know of what you speak on the clutchless upshifts…heehehe

Computers have so changed the industry. They truly do an incredible job when it comes to power management, distribution, shifting etc. Unless there is a EMP weapon dropped lololol.

Overall- Things that were unheard of when I was in High School auto shop. Not to mention how clean and efficient the internal combustion engine is today. Just amazing.
 
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Four days of driving my new Outback, and I am so impressed. Ergonomically, this car is very well thought out. The ride is smooth and quiet, but it feels solid.

It feels a fair bit bigger than what I'm used to driving. For the past 10 years, I've been driving a 2011 Camry. Before that, an '04 STI for eleven years! Before that, an '02 WRX. So, this is a big change in terms of style of car. It's a HUGE change in terms of technology!

I'm happy to be back in the Subaru world! I hope to be driving this for a long time. A really fantastic car.

But we've had a lot of rain, and this black car is DIRTY!
Great feedback. I have to admit, I’m giving Subaru a much closer look that just their little hotrod WRX faire. They have done a great, no, impressive job.

So much for the ‘Liberal Birkenstock-wearing Muffin-Muncher’ stereotype.
 
Still not a manual stick shift in the truest sense of the word, was my point- paddle shifters and no clutch pedal. Not the same. So much of the old school coordination, timing and feel is void from those..pretty much push-button shifting on a lever.

Yep... the "auto-manuals" are actually manual transmissions, but the clutch is on the inside and activated by the computer. Usually two clutches, actually. Not sure how twin clutches work. But in the end, the computer can rev-match downshift MUCH faster than a human. The newest and best auto-manuals (Ferrari, BMW, Lamborghini, etc) can do the shift in 100 milliseconds and even less! And the computer doesn't miss the shift, AND the computer can rev-match EXACTLY.

BUT... when you learn how to do it old-school yourself, it is VERY cool and satisfying.

Here is the master, Aryton Senna (RIP) demonstrating heel-toe / rev-match down shifting.

For those that don't know... the right foot operates the brake and the throttle simultaneously. While slowing for the turn the left foot operates the clutch. The right foot toes are used to press the brake, while the right heel "blips" the throttle to bring the engine revs up to the same speed as the next (lower) transmission gears. This results in a smooth shift without causing engine braking, which would upset the balance of the car in the turn (possibly causing a spin). Hope that made sense!


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzLjZWrpzmQ

The modern "auto-manuals" have a computer doing all that for you.... and much much quicker. But it's not as much fun!
 
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Aryton- what a driver (!) and the venerable NSX. Yeah baybee!!

Yep I believe that heel/toe does in fact keep the power consistent/linear.

Me- I know the full manual is the bomb as described, but I’d be more than happy to suffer with the aforementioned automated manuals…
 
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Me- I know the full manual is the bomb as described, but I’d be more than happy to suffer with the aforementioned automated manuals…

Yeah... if someone says... "I'm giving you this Ferrari, but it's a paddle-shifter auto-manual"....

I might have to compromise! ;)
 
When you talk of an auto-manual, or DSG--Direct Shift Gearbox, you are talking of something invented by Borg Warner. Early versions had inner and outer wet clutch packs not unlike a motorcycle clutch. Later versions had/have dual dry disks. Simply put, one clutch is used for 1-3-5 gears and the other for 2-4-6 gears. The clutches release/apply and shift forks move faster than humanly possible. Early and later "Self-Study" books attached...
 

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Why you buying NEW?
Some times it's a wash on the price per year in this case it might be. New you get better insurance rates and just drive it a few years longer may even things out.
 
You’d be surprised what you can find. The 2023 that my dad just bought looks, smells and drives brand-new and it’s even the color he wanted. With 9k on the odometer, he got a far better price than “new”, AND the dealership gave him a lifetime warranty on the car. A stupendous deal. And they are out there to be found…but I’m glad Brian found what he wanted.
 
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You’d be surprised what you can find. The 2023 that my dad just bought looks, smells and drives brand-new and it’s even the color he wanted. With 9k on the odometer, he got a far better price than “new”, AND the dealership gave him a lifetime warranty on the car. A stupendous deal.
There were some significant changes / additions made from 2023 to the 2024 model year that I find attractive.

Believe me, I know how buying a 1 - 2 year old car is a big savings. I've done it - my last car, for example. Huge savings. It's definitely the SMART way to buy a car.

This time I had my heart set on the '24 Outback. So I got it! 🤠

I'm familiar with the "lifetime warranty." It requires that ALL maintenance be done by an ASE certified mechanic, and it MUST be ON TIME. If you miss just one or are late.... warranty is voided. Also, you can't even change your own oil (something I've done most of my adult life).

The dealership where I got my '24 Outback also offers the "Free Lifetime Warranty." I ended up buying the real deal extended warranty anyway.
 
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There were some significant changes / additions made from 2023 to the 2024 model year that I find attractive.

Believe me, I know how buying a 1 - 2 year old car is a big savings. I've done it - my last car, for example. Huge savings. It's definitely the SMART way to buy a car.

This time I had my heart set on the '24 Outback. So I got it! 🤠

I'm familiar with the "lifetime warranty." It requires that ALL maintenance be done by an ASE certified mechanic, and it MUST be ON TIME. If you miss just one or are late.... warranty is voided. Also, you can't even change your own oil (something I've done most of my adult life).

The dealership where I got my '24 Outback also offers the "Free Lifetime Warranty." I ended up buying the real deal extended warranty anyway.
My response was more towards other’s comments, Racer. I certainly don’t begrudge you buying new (that’s how I’m wired as well for the most part) but if all is equal but model year, then I may hit the prior year model if it’s low mileage. Changes in feature for better or worse, can sway me either direction if they matter.

You know- “Buy once, cry once” is usually how we roll, and it’s served us well. You have to be happy with your purchase once you commit to it. That’s all that matters. Hehe. Just for grins I’m going to look at the 2024 MY updates. Changes in drivetrain specs or suspension matter to me. But, many times it’s the little things that matter. Features or upgrades. For example when one car doesn’t have wireless charging pad for iPhone but the next model year does, and so forth.

I can see my dad using the same dealership for service that he purchased the car from, so that’s a nothingburger for him, and he’s way beyond any DIY maint or repairs lol. But yeah I’m very familiar with the warranty parameters you mentioned.

Here a pic of Dad’s new Subie:
IMG_9404.jpeg
 
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My response was more towards other’s comments, Racer. I certainly don’t begrudge you buying new (that’s how I’m wired as well for the most part) but if all is equal but model year, then I may hit the prior year model if it’s low mileage. Changes in feature for better or worse, can sway me either direction if they matter.

You know- “Buy once, cry once” is usually how we roll, and it’s served us well. You have to be happy with your purchase once you commit to it. That’s all that matters. Hehe. Just for grins I’m going to look at the 2024 MY updates. Changes in drivetrain specs or suspension matter to me. But, many times it’s the little things that matter. Features or upgrades. For example when one car doesn’t have wireless charging pad for iPhone but the next model year does, and so forth.

I can see my dad using the same dealership for service that he purchased the car from, so that’s a nothingburger for him, and he’s way beyond any DIY maint or repairs lol. But yeah I’m very familiar with the warranty parameters you mentioned.

Here a pic of Dad’s new Subie:
View attachment 17324
That red looks sharp!

I'll eventually get some photos of my new "whip." It's rained almost every day since I got it, and I didn't have time to wash it, yet. Maybe next weekend.
 
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